Talking with Kids about Coronavirus

From NPR Comic Based on a Radio Story by Cory Turner – Malaka Gharib/ NPR

NPR: Coronavirus And Parenting: What You Need To Know Now

NOTE: The printable comic for kids is linked through this enlightening article.

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Kids Books Haven’t Prepared Us for the Coronavirus: from Fatherly

Things to think about for the youngest, along with a strong book suggestion: Llama Llama Home with Mama, by Anna Dewdney

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Picture book by Steve Mould

“Meet a glowing squid, traveling fungus spores, and much more in this dynamic and engaging book all about bacteria, viruses, and other germs and microbes. The Bacteria Book walks the line between “ew, gross!” and “oh, cool!,” exploring why we need bacteria and introducing readers to its microbial mates–viruses, fungi, algae, archaea, and protozoa.

 

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From the Indianapolis Public Library:

Fact sheets and FAQs designed especially for use with children are available from kidshealth.org:

 

Women Building Art!

From CNN’s Good Stuff:

The dramatic University of Engineering and Technology campus in Lima, Peru. Credit: Iwan Baan

Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara are the winners of the 2020 Pritzker Prize for architecture. The Irish pair are just the fourth and fifth women to claim the coveted prize in its 41-year history (The Pritzker is essentially the Nobel Prize for architecture). Farrell and McNamara co-founded the Dublin-based firm Grafton Architects, and they are known for their work on educational buildings. The pair have an affinity for dramatic yet metrical structures made of sturdy, uncomplicated materials like concrete and stone. The prize’s jury said the women are “beacons to others” in a largely male-dominated profession.

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Yvonne Farrell, left, and Shelley McNamara Credit: Alice Clancy
Note from Becky:
As extra inspiration for our budding architects, here are some great children’s books about this artistic form and more from Celebrate Picture Books!

 

Honoring Katherine Johnson — from Celebrate Picture Books

If you’ve read the book, “Hidden Figures,” by Margot Lee Shetterly, or have seen the movie, Katherine Johnson is one of the featured “human computers!” In addition to the children’s book about her below, a picture book of “Hidden Figures” is also available. Such amazing women!       ~Becky

Katherine Johnson passed away on February 24 at the age of 101. Recognized from an early age for her brilliance, Katherine went on to become a pivotal mathematician for NASA as the space race led to the first manned missions and lunar landings. She continued working for NASA on the space shuttle and other […]

via February 25 – Honoring Katherine Johnson —

Advocacy Alert from the ALA: Urge Congress to #FundLibraries

This is a copy of an alert from the ALA that I received today through email. For those of you in the U.S., thanks for reading and acting!     ~Becky

As we announced last week, the White House has released its proposed FY2021 budget, and federal library funding has been completely eliminated. Libraries need your support, now more than ever. We need to make sure Congress knows how important this funding is.

Can you stand with libraries by emailing Congress to #FundLibraries?

As the campaign to fund our nation’s libraries continues, we can’t let Congress forget how much communities rely on their local libraries. Add your support now by letting your members of Congress know that you support library funding at the national level.

Please take two minutes to urge Congress to continue to #FundLibraries in FY2021?

These next few weeks will be integral to ensuring Congress continues to #FundLibraries. Keep your eyes open for more advocacy alerts from the ALA team as the budget process continues.

Thank you for standing with the library community,

ALA’s Public Policy & Advocacy Team

Contact Us
ALA Public Policy & Advocacy Office
1615 New Hampshire Ave NW, 1st Floor
Washington, D.C. 20009-2520
Phone: (202) 628-8410

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Talking with Kids about War

The drafty but beloved home of my Michigan childhood featured a rather dim and damp basement that was accessed through a trap door from our kitchen. That cement-floored space was divided into several separate rooms. During the winter, my mother hung washed clothing on lines to dry in the largest of those areas. One of the small rooms was fashioned almost entirely with rough, wooden shelving that held clear Ball and Mason jars filled with fruits and vegetables my mother had canned.

Sometimes we played downstairs while she hung clothes on the line. Being a somewhat apprehensive, quiet, and rather OCD child, one would think I could have been most concerned with falling down the steps (my brother did, once!), about what was hiding in the dark corners, or with that large spider eyeing us from its web, overhead. No, this child of the Fifties and Sixties was silently pondering whether there was enough food for our family on the shelves in that little room, in case we needed to hide out in our basement if “the Russians” attacked!

Did I share those fears with my parents about what I’d overheard on the evening news? I don’t think so. Did they know how scared I was when a B52 flew over from the nearby airbase, wondering if it was “one of ours” or “one of theirs?” I don’t believe they did, or surely they would have said something. I worried a great deal about “war,” but had no idea how to bring up the topic. In the political climate of our world today, there’s no escaping the realities of war or potential for further escalation toward war. Only very young children are easy to shield from the news on television or the internet. There’s no way to ensure that our kids won’t learn about troubling situations in the world.

Some children ask questions and give you plenty of openings to discuss difficult topics. Others, like the childhood version of me, won’t (or can’t find the words to) ask. In those cases, you’ll need to create your own openings, which can be a challenge. That’s where children’s books can help! Along with many other people right now, I’m feeling very helpless about world events, many which have been precipitated right in our “own back yard,” here in the U.S. What can I do? Maybe I can offer some suggestions of children’s books to help parents, grandparents, teachers, and other caring adults approach the difficult subject of war and the equally important topic of conflict resolution with the kids who are important to them!

Why? by Nikolai Popov – Winner: 2017 NCSS/CBC, National Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People

A frog finds a beautiful flower and picks it for himself. When a mouse sees him with it, his jealousy overcomes him, and he swipes it. Frog’s friends come to his aid and chase the mouse away. But before the frogs can celebrate, Mouse’s friends return for a counter-attack. Before long the conflict has devolved into a full-scale frog-mouse war. By the end of it, all either side can ask is: why? This seemingly simple book tackles an important subject and will be an invaluable way to talk to young children about conflict and warfare.

Playing War written by Kathy Beckwith and illustrated by Lea Lyon. Learn the details about this book for children in grades 2-5 at Patricia Tilton’s blog, Children’s Books Heal.

Top 20 Picture Books for Anzac Day, with Children’s Books Daily

8 Books About War for Kids from Scholastic

Conflict Resolution with Young Children at Social Justice Books

Literature for Children and Young Adults Examining Issues of Violence and Conflict Resolution with Center for Civic Education

21 Multicultural Children’s Books About Peace from Colours of Us

I hope you can find something here that fits your particular situations and your children!                     ~Becky

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Talking with Kids about Severe Weather and other Disasters

After a long night of weather warnings and a tornado ripping through nearby Dallas, I’m reminded that some children (and adults!) have an overwhelming fear of extreme weather and other types of disasters. Although many aspects of these scary occurrences are out of our control, as adults, we can stay well-informed and plan ahead as much as possible to help alleviate part of the worry. Kids have the additional challenges of not fully understanding the various situations and not knowing how to prepare for or deal with these events. Maybe you’d like a great book written with children in mind to get an open and informative discussion started!

The ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children), a division of the  American Library Association (ALA), has compiled the Get Ready Get Safe Book List, with titles about preparing for emergencies, monitoring weather or other types of disasters, and overcoming fears in general. A short description of each book is provided, along with the recommended ages. Many topics are addressed, including blizzard, fire, hurricane, tornado, tsunami, earthquake, hailstorm, flood, and blackout. Parents, teachers, and grandparents can surely find a book here that could help.

On a bit of a lighter note, I love sharing the book, Thunder Cake, by Patricia Polacco, with kids. It’s set in my home state of Michigan and tells how a very smart grandmother keeps her worried granddaughter’s mind off an impending thunderstorm. The book includes themes of empowerment and personal strength.

I hope you find something here to share with your favorite youngsters!

 

Talking with Kids about Gun Violence

 

arm me with books

In a perfect world, talking with children about gun violence wouldn’t be necessary. Our world is now further from perfect than I can ever remember, but I’m still hopeful for better days to come. If you’re looking for suggestions of books for kids that can help them cope, please keep reading.                       ~Becky

From Publishers Weekly :

Literary Safari—the New York City-based studio that produces print and digital children’s media with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion—has launched the #ArmMeWithBooks campaign, which seeks to address issues of gun violence in the U.S. 

The campaign, which takes its name from teachers’ responses on social media to the Trump administration’s suggestion of arming educators with guns, is centered on the #ArmMeWithBooks Booklist, a free, downloadable collection of recommended titles—picture books, middle grade, and YA—selected by more than 50 children’s authors. Participants responded to the following question, “What is a must-read for children growing up in these challenging times of mass school shootings and lockdown drills?” The list also includes an original poem by 2018 Arnold Adoff Poetry Award-winner Nikki Grimes.

Sandhya Nankani, founder and publisher of Literary Safari, told PW, “The impetus was to create a toolkit for parents and children to come together and have meaningful conversations around the things happening in the news and in schools.” The parent of a nine-year-old girl, Nankani said, “It has been really interesting to see my daughter’s responses to lockdown drills. We send our children to school to feel safe, to grow and learn. What is the impact of this fear over time? How is that changing generations of children? What do they need more of?” Though she receives emergency protocol information from her daughter’s school, she said, “I wasn’t finding something that spoke to me—something I could use to engage my child.” The book list was created in hopes of filling that gap, by offering stories that highlight social and emotional themes such as empathy and resilience.

December 18, 2018

Visit PW for the rest of this informative article!