Historical Houses as Fictional Characters

Laurium, Michigan

I have no idea about the names of the people in the photo shown above. But I know the house intimately. It was built around 1900 and had been updated countless times when I moved in over 20 years ago. The house still needed a great deal of work, and it really started to shine during the years when I was lucky enough to live there.

A kind resident of the small, Upper Peninsula town loaned me this old photo. They had known someone who lived on the street and realized I might be interested in this historical image of my house. I formed the mat around the copy of this picture with remnants of vintage wallpaper found hiding in the walls during renovations.

After mulling over my story, “Dinner for Two,” for years, I finally knew the missing piece. The house needed to play a more important part as a character, along with the man and then the woman, known only to the reader through the man’s recollections.

I’m pleased to say that my story now appears in UP Reader #6, which is published by Modern History Press! Because this just came out, I can’t share this tale with you, yet. But I’m happy to now post a story that I told you about last year…”Sumac Summer.” This is based on memories my father told me from his own childhood and was such fun to write. I hope you’ll enjoy reading about this young boy’s suspicions of a possible poisonous mistake!

Staghorn Sumac in Michigan

Sumac Summer

“Philip, why are you still awake?” Mom whispered. She carried a lantern to avoid the bright hallway bulb.

“Too hot,” I murmured, from my spot by an open window. Four brothers snored nearby. My six sisters were quiet in their room down the hall.

“A few more minutes and back to bed,” my mother warned, as she left on tiptoes.

Something outside moved from the shadows. Dr. Justin walked the path to my friend’s house with his black medical bag. Was Danny sick?

The stairs squeaked, and I dove for my pillow. I ignored the need for an outhouse visit, pressed my eyes shut, and fell into a sweaty sleep.

***

The air was even warmer when the rooster crowed the next morning.

“Looks like our next-door neighbors moved out,” my big brother, Harold, said at breakfast.

“No way. Danny’s my best friend. He wouldn’t leave without telling me.”

“When I delivered their newspaper, the window shades were still closed, and their car was gone,” said Harold.

“Dr. Justin was over there last night,” I said. “I wonder what happened.”

“I bet they didn’t move,” said my oldest brother, Ernie. “They probably got sick and died from poison, or something.” He clutched his throat and fell to the floor with a choke.

“Don’t tease,” Mom said with a frown. “Danny’s mother mentioned that his father had health problems. She said they might move closer to family in New York.”
                                                                     ***

By the end of that week, I decided Danny was gone for good. Harold reminded me it was my turn to cut the grass. I grabbed the wooden handle and gave our mower a push across the lawn. By the time I finished, the sun was high in the sky. My cheeks were on fire, and my mouth was dry as dirt.

I guzzled water at the kitchen pump and grumbled. “Why can’t we ever buy soda pop from the market?”

“Treats like that cost too much for a family of thirteen,” said Mom.

“Could we make more root beer?”

“That wasn’t cheap, either. And we had a terrible mess in the basement when a bottle exploded.”

“I have an idea for a drink,” Dad said, as he walked into the room. “It’s almost free and not messy to make.”

“What is it?” I asked.

“Sumac (‘sue mack’) juice. It’s been years since I made any, but I remember the steps.”

“Never heard of it.”

“The sumac tree’s red berries can be used to make a lemon-flavored drink,” said Dad. “Some people even call it sumac lemonade.”

I pumped another cup of water and listened.

“The family next door has gone. No one cares if we cut berries from those sumac trees between the two houses,” Dad continued.

“Guess not.” Even though the neighbors had only been gone a week, I missed Danny. He’d been my best friend and could even make doing chores seem like fun.

Dad eyed the trees through the kitchen window. “We’ll soak the berries in water until it’s pink and lemony. Sugar or honey adds a bit of sweetness. The flavor will be strongest when the clusters turn dark red. Here in Northern Michigan, we won’t see that until late summer.”

A quick look at Mom told me she was okay with his idea.  Hadn’t my parents ever heard of poison sumac? With a gulp, I swallowed the words so they wouldn’t escape from my mouth. What if Ernie was right? What if Danny’s family was poisoned? I wanted to trust Dad on this. But it might make us sick, or even worse!

When I checked outside, the skinny leaves on the short, thick trees were mixed with light green flowers. I didn’t see any berries.

Sleep didn’t come easy that night. I jerked awake. “Argh!!!” Danny and some strangers with hollow eyes and red drool on their lips visited my dreams.  Could that nightmare be a sign that sumac juice might not be safe?
                                                                             ***

Within a few weeks, little green berries appeared. They turned a rosier color each time I dared to peek at them. No words popped into my head to warn my parents they might be poisonous. I had to learn the facts before it was too late. Since it was summer vacation, I couldn’t ask my teacher. The library was the best place to start.

“Chores are done, and I’m going for a bike ride.”

“Sorry, Philip,” said Mom. “You’ll need to watch your younger brother and sister.  I’m late for my women’s meeting.” The screen door slammed before I could argue.

Paul and Eunice weren’t too heavy, and I could pull them to the library in our wagon. The shortest way took us past the blue water of the bay. If only we could trade places with the people who played in the waves without a care in the world.

The air was cooler inside the small, brick library. My sister and brother ran toward the picture books. I started my own search for adult books about trees.

“Philip Ross, I haven’t seen you here in a long time,” said the librarian after a while. “Could I help you find something?” She eyed my sister and brother. Had they emptied all those books from the shelves?

“Ah…no, thanks. We should get going.” I grabbed Eunice by the hand and Paul by the shirt. The walk back home with the wagon was even hotter, and I hadn’t learned anything helpful.

Once we got in the yard, I reached to check the trees and found blood-red berries. Some clusters were even covered with white, sticky stuff. We were almost out of time. My new idea felt scary, but I had no choice. I wiped my hands across my pants and planned for the next day.

                                                                       ***

I awoke early to a gray morning. After sneaking from the house, I steered my bike through quiet streets. I headed to the drug store, where one of my older sisters had an afternoon job. While I waited by the locked door for the owner, Mr. Keiser, I peered down the road through the fog.

Teacher told us that druggists go to college for a long time. That’s how they learn to make safe medicines. Mr. Keiser should also know which plants were safe. His tall body finally appeared from the fog. I ignored the lump in my throat and told him my problem. With a strange look, he motioned me inside the store.

“Aren’t you one of Pastor Ross’s boys?” he asked.

“Yes, sir, I’m Phil.”

“Tell me the details.”

He sat on a high stool, and I began with the way Danny and his family had vanished. I ended with my fear that Dad didn’t know the red berries were poison.

“Your worries are over,” he said. “That’s harmless sumac. You can tell by the red or purple clusters that point toward the sky. The sticky part you described has the strongest lemon taste,” he added.

“Is there a kind of sumac that’s poison?” I asked.

“Yes, but that looks very different. It has green or white berries that hang down.”

“Gee, thanks,” I said in relief, and stuck out my hand to shake his.

“Make sure you always check with your parents before eating anything that grows in the wild,” Mr. Keiser reminded me, as I turned for the door.

I flew toward home on my bike and jumped off before the wheels stopped turning. Fat drops of dew sparkled on deep purple berries. “They’re ready,” I yelled, at the back door. “It’s sumac juice time!”

***

As the sun slipped lower in the sky, I sat on our wide porch with my family. Dad filled glasses with sumac juice for everyone. Mom added frosty chunks from the large block the iceman had just brought. The drink was cool, sour, and sweet on my tongue. Everybody liked it, except Eunice, who didn’t like most things.

“Afternoon,” said the mailman, from the bottom step. Mom traded him a glass of juice for a few envelopes. He drank it and talked with my parents on the shaded porch.

Mom sifted through the mail as soon as he’d gone. She held up an envelope, written with ink. A cloud of worry crossed her face. “It’s a letter from out East,” she said and opened it. Her frown soon disappeared. “Philip, it’s from Danny’s mother. She says they left early that morning to beat the heat and apologizes for not saying good-bye.  She’ll work in her family’s store while her husband recovers,” Mom folded the page. “Time will tell, if they’ll move back to Michigan.”

“I’m glad they’re okay,” I said and turned away to hide my sadness.

“Danny sent you a note, Philip.” She raised a paper written in smeared pencil.

I grabbed it and hurried to the side yard that overlooked my friend’s old house and the sumac trees. Danny’s story made me laugh out loud. On their way to New York, he and his mother had to change a flat tire. He described the scene so well that I pictured them in mud up to their knees as they search for a dropped lug nut. Maybe I could think of a tale to send back?

I had a whopper of an idea. I’d write about a missing friend, fear of a poison potion and a tasty ending!

Bottom: Paul, Eunice, Phil, Harold. Middle: Ernie, Rev. & Mrs. Ross; other siblings interspersed

65 thoughts on “Historical Houses as Fictional Characters

  1. Congratulations on the publication of your story, Becky! I really enjoyed “Sumac Summer.” It was quite a nail-biter. (Please don’t poison anyway; please don’t poison anyone!) I look forward to reading “Dinner for Two” when you’re able to share it.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Congratulations, Becky, on the appearance of your “Dinner for Two” story! Also, I really enjoyed reading your “Sumac Summer” story. Well done, and it really evoked feelings of childhood and a bygone time.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A fun story. Thanks for including a library mention. I’ve seen children scatter all the picture books off the shelf and pulling cards out of the old card catalog. Not all parents were equal in keeping up with what their little darlings did.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Sumac-ade is a standard around parts of Texas, and your story certainly brought my the taste of the drink. It was a tasty story, too — like the drink, a little sweet and a little tangy. I really enjoyed it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Wonderful description of my story, Linda. Thanks so much! As a child, my father really liked the drink once he found out it was safe. Not sure if I’ve ever tried it, myself; my mother was still leery about the safety of sumac for her children:)

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Congratulations on the publication in UP Reader, Becky! I loved your story here – I might never taste sumac but I feel as if I have now. Great photos too. I feel nostalgic now for somewhere I have never been..

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Precious story, precious history! I live in an old farmhouse that’s a century old. I’ve wondered about the stories that this old house can tell and now I realize that some of them are more own having lived here for almost 30 years. Congratulations!

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Absolutely agree that a house can be one of the “characters” in a story. And so neat that you have a photo of ‘your’ house from ages before you lived in it. Great story here – well done, and congrats on the publication.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I love the idea of a house being an important character. They often are in spooky/horror movies, but why not in other stories, too? Good for you on having that story published! And now I know that all sumac isn’t poisonous – I always thought those red cones pointing upwards WERE the poisonous kind!

    Liked by 2 people

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