In My Blood

A Spring Favorite: Pulmonaria (Lungwort)

Gardening can be a pleasant diversion, economic necessity, motivating challenge, or even somewhat of an addiction. As mentioned in a previous post, my childhood was surrounded by lovely gardens that produced both beauty and bounty. In adulthood, I slowly grew into my own on the gardening front.

My Small Vegetable Garden in Michigan

All of this stopped short when I moved from my home in Michigan and chose a “temporary” Texas apartment with no personal outdoor space. I hoped to get more creative with indoor gardening and had no idea to what extent I would miss having a garden area beyond my windows. After about three years, my plans and hopes to change all of this have finally come together!

Indoor Plants in Current Place

A move just one floor down in my apartment building offers me the balcony of my dreams. I’ll miss the direct view of sunrise and many moons rising, as well, but by moving to the other side, I’ll have sunsets and a lovely view of the Square. On the second floor, I’ll also be closer to tree level and sounds of birdsong. What will I grow in my balcony garden?

View of Square from Balcony

My gardening experience in Texas is limited, so research is in order. To further complicate matters, I move in mid-November, which isn’t peak season. As we all know, climate is quite unpredictable these days, but I’m gathering resources about year ’round container gardening in Texas. I’d like to have something that flowers (pansies?) and herbs or other types of plants that might come in handy for cooking. I’d love to try leaf lettuce in the spring! Covering plants during the winter for protection during frost or even bringing pots inside shouldn’t be too much of a problem. I’m excited! Looks like my hardiness zone is listed as 8a. I’d love to read ideas in comments if you live in a similar area and have container planting ideas to share!

Pansies

This new activity will certainly be a pleasant diversion to get me away from the computer on occasion. This could even save me money that might otherwise be spent on fresh herbs, which can be pricey. I’m definitely motivated and intrigued by this new challenge. As for the addictive part, only time will tell. Gardening is, after all, in my blood. That phrase reminds me of a  song I love, “You’re in My Veins,” by Andrew Belle. Hope you like it, too, and will give it a listen!

45 thoughts on “In My Blood

  1. I’m so glad you will be realizing this dream! I, unfortunately, don’t have that gene, but I sure enjoy the flowers and produce of my family and friends. Your plans sound like fun, and I wish you every happiness in your new place.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Becky I don’t live in your area, I am located in Queensland Australia. I live on the ground level in a small one bedroom unit. I have got one Peace Lily plant inside. I don’t have a courtyard but do have a small veranda. I grow strawberries, chives, parsley, rosemary and a few other herbs. I plan to also get some pots of colour like pansies and daisys etc. Like you I love gardening but due to aging and health issues I have become restricted.
    Happy gardening Becky 🦋🌺🌹🌻🌵🌾🌿⚘🌸

    Liked by 4 people

      1. I may have tried the wrong herbs. The rosemary did fine for a while and then turned all brown. The parsley was growing well until I cut most of it to use and it never produced after that. I do know that I tend to over-water…

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I never had much luck really either – but herbs indoors sortof worked better than other things. Living now in the PNW and having more success here I’d almost blame the extreme temps there in the Midwest… but ???

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I have little knowledge of the Texan climate, although I imagine you will still have a reasonable amount of daylight in winter as well as reasonable temperatures. So you might even be able to grow tender herbs like basil all year round in the balcony.

    If you like chillies, they are a beautiful plant and actually quite robust. And lavender and rosemary are great, as they are happy if you have a tendency to forget to do the watering.

    You could also have tomatoes on your balcony. Even one plant could give you a fair number of fruit.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. You might find it quite hot in the summer if your place faces west. Be prepared to water, as others have said. But a balcony does give you a lot of scope for both flowering plants, herbs, and vegetables. Definitely worth experimenting!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I think my hardiness zone is 2b or 3b (depending on where you look). I haven’t had much luck with growing vegetables (I planted some seeds but lost them all to slugs I think this summer), but I love growing flowers (especially in pots on my deck during the summer). My biggest issue though is having cat-friendly plants everywhere! Inside I have some spider plants (they seem to do pretty well), a whole bunch of violets, a pothos and a zamioculcas that has done okay. I’ve recently added a fern and some snake plants (because they supposedly don’t need direct sunlight, which is at a premium in my place because the windowsills all belong to my cat!) Some of the plants I have may not be strictly cat friendly (I’ve read that they can cause an upset stomach if eaten) but I’ve been lucky in that Merlin doesn’t bother with any of them. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I know what a challenge indoor plants can be with cats! For outdoors, ammonia mixed with water and added near the roots of plants that have come up can help to prevents slugs. This really saved my hostas when I was still in Michigan.

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