Talking with Kids about Honesty

Children learn a great deal about honesty through observation of examples set by their family members, friends, and various adults in positions of authority, such as church leaders, teachers, and political leaders. Unfortunately, many in that latter category don’t seem to be setting a very good example for our youngsters, these days. It appears that power and greed have taken over and kicked the value of honesty aside. Some political leaders have even taken to handing out punishments to those who are brave and noble enough to stand up and tell the truth!

Young children don’t understand all the details they overhear or see in the media. They are, however, familiar with the word “lie,” which currently appears a great deal in the news. This must be confusing for children. We used to, with a fairly clear conscience, teach them to admire and show respect for adults, which generally included our local, state, and national political leaders. That no longer seems possible.

Kids might not come to you with their questions, but they certainly must be wondering what to think about the importance of honesty. Once again, let’s turn to some great children’s book selections as a way to bring up the topic. Maybe you can get an important conversation started!

 

Scholastic: 5 Children’s Books That Encourage Honesty

Teach your child the importance of truthfulness with these five picture books.

 

CHILDREN’S BOOKS ABOUT HONESTY

At “Growing Book by Book”  Includes book list and descriptions, along with discussion guides.

 

The Lying King” at Children’s Books Heal

 

And it’s not too early to prepare for National Honesty Day at Celebrate Picture Books!

 

Happy Critique-iversary!

Three years ago this month, a small group of children’s writers and illustrators met at the Frisco, Texas, library to share and critique their works in progress. I’m happy to say we’re still meeting each month and have seen numerous successes along the way. Several of the same members attend regularly, many others have joined, and some float through when it fits their schedules. We’re an open group, and the only requirements are to be 18 years or over and to have an interest in children’s written and/or illustrated works, for babies to young adults.

During the intervening years, members have queried and submitted to agents and publishers, had books traditionally published and self-published, signed with an agent, had stories published (both online and in print), and have won honors, such as those through the North Texas Book Festival. Many of us belong to SCBWI (Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators), other critique groups, 12 X 12 Challenge, and have been Storystorm participants and winners.

One of the best aspects of our group, Write 4 Kids, is the positive and helpful feedback atmosphere. This is a safe and accepting place for us to share our works, ideas, successes, disappointments, industry information, and valuable technology hints. Here’s to another year!!!                   ~Becky

February 8 – It’s Children’s Authors’ and Illustrators’ Week — re-blog from Celebrate Picture Books!

Visit Celebrate Picture Books to read about this fun book related to punctuation and writing!     ~Becky

About the Holiday This week was established to raise awareness and promote literacy and the joys and benefits of reading. During the week, children’s authors and illustrators attend special events at schools, bookstores, libraries, and other community centers to share their books and get kids excited about reading. To learn more about how you can […]

via February 8 – It’s Children’s Authors and Illustrators Week —

Critique Group: what we bring to the table

 

The first Wednesday evening of each month finds me at the local library rearranging the tables for critique group. This gathering of writers and illustrators for children’s works has taken place for about 18 months, now, and has evolved a great deal during that time. Attendees come and go with their own particular needs, which is to be anticipated with this type of group, and a usual core of ‘regulars’ shows up on a dependable basis.

Members include those who are traditionally and self-published, in addition to those who are seeking their first publication, or who might just enjoy the process of writing. We share our works in progress, give voice to our successes and disappointments, offer praise and helpful advice, in addition to discussing common concerns related to our craft and industry.

I think that the biggest change I have seen during this time is the wide variety of creations that those attending bring in to read, show, and discuss. Yes, writers still share complete and partial picture books or chapter book texts. In addition, we’ve mulled over many a query letter and just had our first taste of a press release, as well. Illustrations now run the gamut from sketches to full-color renderings and include those to be used in picture books, magazine/newspaper stories, social media banners, and for pure inspiration!

Bottom line, there’s a great deal of “work” and communication that needs attention, beyond the specific written and/or illustrated products that we hope to publish. Within our ranks, we’re finding a supportive environment for ALL of those needs, and we’re each adding to or reinforcing our personal knowledge with every new encounter.

I can hardly wait to see what the second half of this year brings!

If YOU belong to a critique group, I would love to read comments about the types of works that are shared.

~Becky~

 

What Makes an Effective Writing Critique Group Member?

 

 

I’m very thankful for the two local critique groups that I attend and always leave feeling renewed and inspired. One is a well-established combination of writers from all different genres. I lead the second one, which is a newer compilation of writers and illustrators for children’s literature. Each group meets in person monthly, and occasional digital critique swaps are also requested and take place in between our gatherings. Since I’ve been taking part and observing for some time, now, several aspects for effectiveness have jumped out at me and motivated the following suggestions:

*When commenting in writing or orally, try to start out with a positive, follow with suggestions, and possibly end with another positive, as time allows (“sandwich” approach)

*Point out specific sections of the pieces for examples whenever possible, instead of speaking in generalities

*Keep in mind “nerves” and any misgivings you may have had when you first joined the group, upon greeting new attendees

*When receiving feedback, try to listen to a member’s full comments before responding with an explanation of your thinking or reasoning (this can be difficult to do!)

*Share your successes AND your disappointments, which can help to form connections between members

*Offer critiques on a continuing basis, even during those times when your own work is not being shared

Am I ALWAYS successful in remembering to do each of these things? I admit that I’m not, but these are my goals, since I can see how these strategies work so well when implemented. Feel free to add comments with ideas you’ve found to be especially helpful in your own groups!