Talking with Kids about Coronavirus

From NPR Comic Based on a Radio Story by Cory Turner – Malaka Gharib/ NPR

NPR: Coronavirus And Parenting: What You Need To Know Now

NOTE: The printable comic for kids is linked through this enlightening article.

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Kids Books Haven’t Prepared Us for the Coronavirus: from Fatherly

Things to think about for the youngest, along with a strong book suggestion: Llama Llama Home with Mama, by Anna Dewdney

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Picture book by Steve Mould

“Meet a glowing squid, traveling fungus spores, and much more in this dynamic and engaging book all about bacteria, viruses, and other germs and microbes. The Bacteria Book walks the line between “ew, gross!” and “oh, cool!,” exploring why we need bacteria and introducing readers to its microbial mates–viruses, fungi, algae, archaea, and protozoa.

 

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From the Indianapolis Public Library:

Fact sheets and FAQs designed especially for use with children are available from kidshealth.org:

 

Women Building Art!

From CNN’s Good Stuff:

The dramatic University of Engineering and Technology campus in Lima, Peru. Credit: Iwan Baan

Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara are the winners of the 2020 Pritzker Prize for architecture. The Irish pair are just the fourth and fifth women to claim the coveted prize in its 41-year history (The Pritzker is essentially the Nobel Prize for architecture). Farrell and McNamara co-founded the Dublin-based firm Grafton Architects, and they are known for their work on educational buildings. The pair have an affinity for dramatic yet metrical structures made of sturdy, uncomplicated materials like concrete and stone. The prize’s jury said the women are “beacons to others” in a largely male-dominated profession.

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Yvonne Farrell, left, and Shelley McNamara Credit: Alice Clancy
Note from Becky:
As extra inspiration for our budding architects, here are some great children’s books about this artistic form and more from Celebrate Picture Books!

 

Honoring Katherine Johnson — from Celebrate Picture Books

If you’ve read the book, “Hidden Figures,” by Margot Lee Shetterly, or have seen the movie, Katherine Johnson is one of the featured “human computers!” In addition to the children’s book about her below, a picture book of “Hidden Figures” is also available. Such amazing women!       ~Becky

Katherine Johnson passed away on February 24 at the age of 101. Recognized from an early age for her brilliance, Katherine went on to become a pivotal mathematician for NASA as the space race led to the first manned missions and lunar landings. She continued working for NASA on the space shuttle and other […]

via February 25 – Honoring Katherine Johnson —

Boo Boo’s 15 Minutes of Fame

National Walking the Dog Day – Who knew there was a special day on the calendar to celebrate walking the dog?! When I saw this announcement,  I thought back to a newspaper picture from 2012 I had saved in an old, decorated picnic basket. On the day captured above, I took my dog, Boo Boo, for a walk near what was then my home in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. I remember that autumn afternoon in mid October was beautiful…sunny and mild with plenty of colors remaining on the trees and ground cover. I can still smell that musty scent of fallen leaves.

A gentleman from The Evening News drove by and stopped to ask if he could take our picture. I agreed, thinking this would somehow immortalize my aging Shih Tzu. I spelled our names for the man, and he went on his way after clicking this photo. As you might notice, when this was published in the newspaper, my name is misspelled, but Boo Boo’s is not. Seems only right, since it was my faithful friend’s 15 minutes of fame.

I loved taking this sweet dog for walks, even in cold and snowy weather. We both benefited from the exercise and fresh air. It gave us time to be alone. I often talked with him about the things on my mind, and he was a wonderful listener. We had some adventures on our strolls, as well, such as near misses with skunks and snow plows. Over the years, we met many cute kids and sometimes scary stray dogs, who always wanted to come close and say hello. I was lucky to share many hours with such an affectionate and determined little guy and miss him more than I thought possible! I still walk, but it’s just not the same.

Younger Days with a Shorter, North Carolina Haircut

Children’s author, Elizabeth Stevens Omlor, and illustrator, Neesha Hudson, have captured the joys of walking our furry friends in their adorable book, Walk Your Dog. Important themes of teamwork, cooperation, and patience are beautifully addressed. You might want to look for it at your local library or bookstore!

Advocacy Alert from the ALA: Urge Congress to #FundLibraries

This is a copy of an alert from the ALA that I received today through email. For those of you in the U.S., thanks for reading and acting!     ~Becky

As we announced last week, the White House has released its proposed FY2021 budget, and federal library funding has been completely eliminated. Libraries need your support, now more than ever. We need to make sure Congress knows how important this funding is.

Can you stand with libraries by emailing Congress to #FundLibraries?

As the campaign to fund our nation’s libraries continues, we can’t let Congress forget how much communities rely on their local libraries. Add your support now by letting your members of Congress know that you support library funding at the national level.

Please take two minutes to urge Congress to continue to #FundLibraries in FY2021?

These next few weeks will be integral to ensuring Congress continues to #FundLibraries. Keep your eyes open for more advocacy alerts from the ALA team as the budget process continues.

Thank you for standing with the library community,

ALA’s Public Policy & Advocacy Team

Contact Us
ALA Public Policy & Advocacy Office
1615 New Hampshire Ave NW, 1st Floor
Washington, D.C. 20009-2520
Phone: (202) 628-8410

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Talking with Kids about Honesty

Children learn a great deal about honesty through observation of examples set by their family members, friends, and various adults in positions of authority, such as church leaders, teachers, and political leaders. Unfortunately, many in that latter category don’t seem to be setting a very good example for our youngsters, these days. It appears that power and greed have taken over and kicked the value of honesty aside. Some political leaders have even taken to handing out punishments to those who are brave and noble enough to stand up and tell the truth!

Young children don’t understand all the details they overhear or see in the media. They are, however, familiar with the word “lie,” which currently appears a great deal in the news. This must be confusing for children. We used to, with a fairly clear conscience, teach them to admire and show respect for adults, which generally included our local, state, and national political leaders. That no longer seems possible.

Kids might not come to you with their questions, but they certainly must be wondering what to think about the importance of honesty. Once again, let’s turn to some great children’s book selections as a way to bring up the topic. Maybe you can get an important conversation started!

 

Scholastic: 5 Children’s Books That Encourage Honesty

Teach your child the importance of truthfulness with these five picture books.

 

CHILDREN’S BOOKS ABOUT HONESTY

At “Growing Book by Book”  Includes book list and descriptions, along with discussion guides.

 

The Lying King” at Children’s Books Heal

 

And it’s not too early to prepare for National Honesty Day at Celebrate Picture Books!

 

Happy Critique-iversary!

Three years ago this month, a small group of children’s writers and illustrators met at the Frisco, Texas, library to share and critique their works in progress. I’m happy to say we’re still meeting each month and have seen numerous successes along the way. Several of the same members attend regularly, many others have joined, and some float through when it fits their schedules. We’re an open group, and the only requirements are to be 18 years or over and to have an interest in children’s written and/or illustrated works, for babies to young adults.

During the intervening years, members have queried and submitted to agents and publishers, had books traditionally published and self-published, signed with an agent, had stories published (both online and in print), and have won honors, such as those through the North Texas Book Festival. Many of us belong to SCBWI (Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators), other critique groups, 12 X 12 Challenge, and have been Storystorm participants and winners.

One of the best aspects of our group, Write 4 Kids, is the positive and helpful feedback atmosphere. This is a safe and accepting place for us to share our works, ideas, successes, disappointments, industry information, and valuable technology hints. Here’s to another year!!!                   ~Becky